When the ‘Resistance’ Gets Reprehensible

by David French

Yesterday, the “Women’s March” tweeted birthday greetings for one of the FBI’s most-wanted domestic terrorists, a woman by the name of Assata Shakur. Here’s the tweet:

Who is Shakur? The FBI’s account of her crimes, written in dry, bureaucratic language, should be horrifying enough:

On May 2, 1973, Chesimard, who was part of a revolutionary extremist organization known as the Black Liberation Army, and two accomplices were stopped for a motor vehicle violation on the New Jersey Turnpike by two troopers with the New Jersey State Police. At the time, Chesimard was wanted for her involvement in several felonies, including bank robbery. Chesimard and her accomplices opened fire on the troopers. One trooper was wounded and the other was shot and killed execution-style at point-blank range. Chesimard fled the scene, but was subsequently apprehended. One of her accomplices was killed in the shoot-out and the other was also apprehended and remains in jail.

But that’s hardly the full story. In an extended Washington Post piece, Krissah Thompson provided context for Shakur’s crimes. Her shootout with the police didn’t happen because an otherwise-innocent person was caught at the wrong place, at the wrong time. She was an active terrorist. As Thompson notes, her “involvement [in the black power movement] was deeper than sit-ins and protests; her activism was of the sort that led to open discussion of the possibility of a race war. She was among the ’self-styled revolutionaries who committed acts of violence that they defined as revolutionary, inspired by guerrilla revolts in places like Cuba.’” In fact, even before the fatal 1973 shootout she was alleged to have committed a number of other brazen crimes.

All told, “from 1970 to 1984, the BLA was responsible for four bombings, four hijackings and 32 violent armed confrontations in the United States. Sixteen of those involved confrontations with law enforcement officers who were killed.” In other words, by every reasonable contemporary definition of terrorism, Shakur was a violent terrorist who belonged to a violent terrorist organization. In 1979, she escaped from prison, fled to Cuba, and has been celebrated by radical leftists ever since.

Groups like the Women’s March and Black Lives Matter follow a familiar pattern. With the aid of a complicit media, they portray themselves as thoroughly mainstream, peaceful progressive movements. Scratch below the surface, however, and you’ll find admiration for violent struggle and sometimes outright incitements to violence. How many Black Lives Matter protests are only “mostly” peaceful? How many times have BLM protesters openly called for hurting police? Do the soccer moms who proudly knitted their “pussy hats” know that the movement they joined honors one of the FBI’s most-wanted terrorists? Moderates are duped into funding and supporting radicals, and the media largely plays along.

One final note,  two weeks ago defenders on the Left claimed that it was sheer nonsense that Women’s March organizer Linda Sarsour could possibly mean anything violent when she called for a “form of jihad” against the Trump administration. Yet today, her movement tweets support for a terrorist. You can’t applaud violent criminals and then act outraged when concerned Americans express alarm at extreme rhetoric — especially when that rhetoric comes just days after the attempted assassination of a dozen Republican members of Congress. There is of course such a thing as responsible “resistance.” But this tweet? It’s reprehensible. 

 

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